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Boat Hire Durban

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For : Spirit of eLan
Date Added : April 12, 2013 Views : 518
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The Bay of Natal was discovered in 1497 by Vasco de Gama, who put down his ships anchor just off the Bluff, on Christmas Day. The land they could see, whilst anchored offshore, was christened Natal, in honour of the birth of Christ.

Over the next few centuries ships would anchor in the protection of the Bluff in Port Natal | Boat Rides In Durban, but it wasn’t until 1824 that a settlement was established on the north side of Port Natal.

The early white settlers chose Port Natal because of its sheltered harbour, but a sand bar, caused by currents, that reached across the mouth of the bay only allowed small vessels to cross into the harbour.

The sand bar made crossing into the bay highly hazardous for all but the smallest vessels and a large numbers of ships were wrecked in the attempt to cross it. Larger vessels were forced anchor outside the entrance to the harbour and remain open to the elements. Cargo and passengers had to be ferried in smaller vessels over the sandbar into the port.

Many attempts were made to remove the sand bar, starting in 1849. It took 58 years for a solution to be found that eventually allowed the Armadale Castle, the first large ship, to enter the Durban Harbour in 1904.

In 1835 Port Natal was renamed Durban | Durban Cruises after Sir Benjamin D’Urban, the governor of the Cape Colony from 1834 – 1837.

Wilsons Wharf Marina is home to the Spirit of Elan, a 45ft Royal Cape Catamaran, available for private charters from Boat Hire Durban | Boat Cruises In Durban.

This luxury yacht, complete with 5 en suite cabins, an equipped galley kitchen, braai facilities and an experience crew, is available from boat hire Durban, for you to take a trip out of Durban harbour and to experience what our ancestors felt like years ago. With a little imagination and the sound of wind rushing through the sails, you can go back in time to an era when ships had no engines just sails.

The Bay of Natal was discovered in 1497 by Vasco de Gama, who put down his ships anchor just off the Bluff, on Christmas Day. The land they could see, whilst anchored offshore, was christened Natal, in honour of the birth of Christ.

Over the next few centuries ships would anchor in the protection of the Bluff in Port Natal, but it wasn’t until 1824 that a settlement was established on the north side of Port Natal.

The early white settlers chose Port Natal because of its sheltered harbour, but a sand bar, caused by currents, that reached across the mouth of the bay only allowed small vessels to cross into the harbour.

The sand bar made crossing into the bay highly hazardous for all but the smallest vessels and a large numbers of ships were wrecked in the attempt to cross it. Larger vessels were forced anchor outside the entrance to the harbour and remain open to the elements. Cargo and passengers had to be ferried in smaller vessels over the sandbar into the port.

Many attempts were made to remove the sand bar, starting in 1849. It took 58 years for a solution to be found that eventually allowed the Armadale Castle, the first large ship, to enter the Durban Harbour in 1904.

In 1835 Port Natal was renamed Durban after Sir Benjamin D’Urban, the governor of the Cape Colony from 1834 – 1837.

Wilsons Wharf Marina is home to the Spirit of Elan, a 45ft Royal Cape Catamaran, available for private charters from boat hire Durban.

This luxury yacht, complete with 5 en suite cabins, an equipped galley kitchen, braai facilities and an experience crew, is available from boat hire Durban, for you to take a trip out of Durban harbour and to experience what our ancestors felt like years ago. With a little imagination and the sound of wind rushing through the sails, you can go back in time to an era when ships had no engines just sails.


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